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Lamp Recycling

Our lamp recycling program is unparalleled, recycling over 10,000,000 lamps per year.


We are the largest lamp recycler in Canada and not by accident. We are innovators in the lamp-recycling industry with over 23 years of experience under our belt. Our company has developed different lamp-recycling methods that can accommodate a wide variety of needs.

Compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), and with other energy-efficient lighting such as linear fluorescent and high intensity discharge (HID) lamps contain a small amount of mercury, an element essential to achieving energy savings. As effective as it is at enabling white light, however, mercury (sometimes referred to as quicksilver) is also highly toxic. The problem comes when the lamp breaks, releasing mercury vapour and mercury contaminated phosphor powder, particularly when it is at end of life. Mercury does not decompose or break down in landfill, but does bio-accumulate in humans and our environment.

We make it easy to recycle. Unlike specialty companies, we are the only company in Canada that can also recycle PCB ballasts, dispose of all types of PCB wastes, recycle fixtures and other electrical equipment, manage all your company’s hazardous waste, and more.

Our organization offers a full complement of containers to safely transport spent lamps and fixtures.

Need shipping containers for your next lamp retrofit project? From small to large we have you covered. Choose from our many shipping container options as shown below and contact us for pricing.

Small Containers

Large Containers

Only have enough to fill one box? No problem, we also offer our Recycle-By-Mail program for recycling small quantities of spent lamps. It’s as easy as 1-2-3…click, pack, ship. To find out more about this nation-wide service program click here.

Get your certificate of recycling simply by clicking here to order yours now.

Click here to review "Sound Management of End-Of-Life Lamps Containing Mercury" information, as published by Environment and Climate Change Canada.

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